Samsung expects record Galaxy shipments, S6 edge shortage

(Reuters) – Samsung Electronics Co Ltd (005930.KS) expects record shipments for its new Galaxy S6 smartphones and said it will struggle to meet demand for the curved-edged version due to production constraints, adding to hopes for a turnaround in mobile sales.

The S6 models are widely expected to sell briskly following a string of positive reviews, boosting prospects for an earnings recovery in 2015. This week, the company estimated its January-March operating profit to be its highest in three quarters, which analysts said was partly because Samsung put its own chips in the new phones.

Samsung expects the flat screen S6 to sell more than the higher-margin S6 edge – priced about $120 more in South Korea – but mobile chief J.K. Shin said at a media event on Thursday the firm won’t be able to keep up with demand for the latter model in the near term because the curved screens are harder to manufacture.

“Some carriers are switching existing orders to get more of the S6 edge, and it looks like demand for the model will exceed supply throughout this year,” said HMC Investment analyst Greg Roh. “That means average selling price will fall at a slower rate, which will have a positive impact on Samsung overall.”

Samsung has not disclosed its shipment record for the handset. Analysts regard the Galaxy S3 as its best-selling model overall, though they estimate the Galaxy S4 to have done better in its initial year, when a model is most profitable.

Nomura estimated that Samsung sold 80 million S3s in three years from its 2012 launch, and 43 million S4s from the model’s April 2013 launch to the end of that year. Some analysts say Samsung could ship 50 million or more S6 phones this year.

Samsung’s Shin also said the South Korean electronics maker is preparing a variety of wearable devices, including a new version of its Gear smartwatch, but did not give specifics. Arch-rival Apple Inc (AAPL.O) is due to roll out its much-anticipated smartwatch on April 24.

QUALCOMM STILL A PARTNER

Shin acknowledged that Samsung opted for its own mobile processor and modem chip in the Galaxy S6 instead of equivalents from U.S.-based Qualcomm Inc (QCOM.O).

Samsung previously relied heavily on Qualcomm chips for its flagship phones, but recent reports based on dismantling Samsung’s handsets showed the firm replaced many Qualcomm chips with its own. Shin said the companies remain close partners.

“We have to use the best engines to make our products competitive, which is why we opted to use our own chips,” Shin said. “But we may very well end up using products from Qualcomm again in the next Galaxy phone.”

The new Galaxy devices go on sale in 20 countries on Friday.

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The best Samsung Galaxy S6 deals in April 2015

The Samsung Galaxy S6 has been one of the most hyped handsets of recent years. Samsung, it seems, has realised that the public needed a phone that wasn’t just a powerhouse, or with the latests features but something which looked different and had a bit of glamour about it.

So, the S6 and S6 Edge are two handsets that represent a complete reworking of Samsung’s flagship phones. Both have removed the microSD slot and user-replaceable battery.

  • Compare the market: use TechRadar’s Samsung Galaxy S6 comparison charts

These are two things that were tentpoles of previous Samsung Galaxy phones, and some people will miss them a great deal. That said Samsung has made some changes that make these things less of an issue, for one thing, the minimum capacity of the S6 is now 32GB and at the high end goes up to 128GB.

One thing is for sure though, if you want the S6 it’s going to cost you a decent amount of money, so let’s get on with getting you the best possible price.

The UK’s best Galaxy S6 deal:

This month’s best S6 deal: For now at least, the cheapest possible deal on a Samsung Galaxy S6 in the UK is on O2. You’ll need to pay £394.99 for the handset, but this does reduce your monthly costs to just £13.50. The problem with this is that you get a fairly meager 100 minutes of calls, texts are unlimited, but the data allowance is just 100mb. On a modern smartphone there’s just no way that 100mb is enough data, so bear that in mind.

  • Total cost: over 24 months £718.99
  • Get this deal: direct from Mobiles.co.uk

Compare: all Samsung Galaxy S6 deals

Now let’s break down the best Samsung Galaxy S6 deals by network…

Best Galaxy S6 deals on EE

EE is the network to go to if you want high-speed 4G

Deal 1: 1000 mins, 1GB data, unlimited texts, £159.99 upfront, £31.99pm
The best deal we found on EE offers a split between up-front cost and a monthly fee. Here you’re paying £159.99 initially and then £31.99 per month. That gets you 1GB of data, 1000 minutes of calls and unlimited texts. The data is a little bit low, but we think you can get by with 1GB unless you’re a very heavy user.

  • Total cost: £927.75
  • Get this deal: direct from The Carphone Warehouse

Deal 2: Unlimited mins, 4GB data, Unlimited texts, £129.99 up front, £31.99pm
For those looking for a mountain of data, the best bet is probably for an S6 32GB at £129.99 up-front and then a monthly cost of £31.99. That gets you 4GB of data and unlimited calls and texts.

  • Total cost: £933.75
  • Get this deal: direct from The Carphone Warehouse

Deal 3: Unlimited mins, 5GB data, unlimited texts, FREE up front, £46.99pm
To get the handset with no up-front payment, you’ll need to pay £46.99 per month, which will get you unlimited calls and texts along with a generous 5GB of data. What you’ll notice from our total cost calculation below though, is that you pay a premium to spread the cost of the phone over the period of your contract. If you can afford it, deal 2 is better value and only gives a small amount less data.

  • Total cost: £1,127.76
  • Get this deal: direct from The Carphone Warehouse

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge faces shortages as demand outstrips supply

Higher than expected demand for difficult-to-manufacture curved screen smartphone means company is unlikely to be able to keep up

hardware of samsung  won’t be able to keep up with unexpectedly high demand for its new curved screen Galaxy S6 Edge smartphone, the company has admitted.

Head of mobile JK Shin told press on Thursday that because the curved screens of the S6 Edge, which roll over the left and right sides of the smartphones, are difficult to manufacture the Korean firm won’t be able to keep up with demand for the model in the near term.

Samsung released the curved smartphone as higher-priced twin to the regular flat-screened Galaxy S6, which was expected to be the dominant model of the two. But higher than expected levels of pre-orders at some UK retailers and mobile phone operators are running at a 60/40 split between the S6 Edge and the regular S6, according to multiple sources talking to the Guardian.

“Some carriers are switching existing orders to get more of the S6 Edge, and it looks like demand for the model will exceed supply throughout this year,” said HMC Investment analyst Greg Roh. “That means average selling price will fall at a slower rate, which will have a positive impact on Samsung overall.”

The Galaxy S6, which ships in 20 countries starting 10 April, is expected to set a sales record for Samsung’s Galaxy series of smartphones, said Lee Sang-chul, head of mobile marketing at the company, although he did not release figures for the current record of handset sales.

Nomura analysts estimated that Samsung sold 80m Galaxy S3s in three years from its 2012 launch, and 43m S4s from the model’s April 2013 introduction to the end of that year. Some analysts say Samsung could ship 50m or more S6 phones this year. For comparison, Samsung’s chief rival Apple shipped 74.5m iPhones, of which it sells four models, in the last quarter of 2014 according to data from research firm Strategy Analytics.

Samsung’s Shin also said the South Korean electronics maker is preparing a variety of wearable devices, including a new version of its Gear smartwatch, but did not give specifics. Apple’s first wearable device is due to roll out its 24 April, with pre-orders starting on 10 April.

Some people report Android 5.0 Lollipop Problems On Samsung Galaxy Note 4: Battery Drain, Forced Reboots, App Issues

Owners of the Galaxy Note 4, Samsung’s current flagship phablet, have reported performance issues after updating to the new Android 5.0 Lollipop OS.

Samsung is feverishly preparing for the release of its latest flagship smartphones, the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge. The company has begun preorders at all affiliated carriers in anticipation of the April 10 release date. Both smartphones will be running Android 5.0 Lollipop, the latest Android OS, out of the box.

Additionally, several affiliated retail stores have also started accepting preorders for the new flagships from Samsung.

Meanwhile, many owners of the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 are still waiting to receive the Lollipop software update. Verizon, T-Mobile and U.S. Cellular customers with the smartphone have yet to taste Lollipop, but for those users who have, the taste may not be as sweet as they anticipated.

Sprint released the Android 5.0 Lollipop update to the Galaxy Note 4 in early March, and AT&T rolled it out to its users later in the month, along with the update to the Note 4’s predecessor, the Galaxy Note 3. It seems that, while some users are happy with the update and see improvements, particularly in the case of the AT&T rollout, other customers are experiencing issues with the software.

Online forums are buzzing with numerous issues experienced by AT&T Galaxy Note 4 owners including random reboots, forced closing of apps and battery drain problems. The issues are similar to those experienced recently by HTC One M8 users after receiving the Lollipop update. Many of those experiencing problems are being told to perform a factory reset of their phones, which is sometimes effective, but in other cases does not improve things.

While some issues when instituting a major OS upgrade on any device are inevitable, it appears that some of the problems being reported may be due to software issues that need to be sorted out and integrated into a newer version of the update. Verizon began rolling out Android 5.0 Lollipop to the Galaxy S5 in February and then suddenly halted the rollout until proceeding with a new build number just several days ago. While the company has remained mum on the details, it is presumed that software issues with the update necessitated the delay. It’s difficult to evaluate the Note 4 situation because some users are having no issues whatsoever since receiving the update and are actually reporting improvements such as increased battery life.

Do you have a Galaxy Note 4 that has recently been updated to Android 5.0 Lollipop? What has been your experience so far? Let us know in the comments below.

Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Just As Bendable As Apple iPhone 6 Plus

The Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge was subjected to a bend test this week, and the results show the Korean smartphone maker could be eating its own pride when it leered and jeered at Apple over Bendgate last year.

Gadget warranty firm SquareTrade put three high-end smartphones to the test, the Galaxy S6 Edge, the HTC One M9, and the iPhone 6 Plus, which became the subject of criticism by disappointed Apple fans complaining that their Apple phablets were bending in their pockets and ridicule by pretty much everyone else, including Samsung.

But a video of SquareTrade’s bend test shows the Galaxy S6 Edge bends just as easily as the iPhone 6 Plus. In fact, the Samsung handset’s screen actually shatters at a point where the iPhone 6 Plus only bent. The One M9, on the other hand, is slightly better at withstanding pressure, but once bent, the handset could no longer be turned on.

Each smartphone is put to the test by placing an increasing weight in the middle of the phone. The SquareTrade test shows both the Galaxy S6 Edge and the iPhone 6 Plus started to bend at 110 pounds, while the One M9 fared slightly better at 120 pounds. However, HTC decided to place the power button of the One M9 in the middle, so when the phone bent, the power button popped out and the phone essentially became a brick, albeit a bent brick.

Both the Galaxy S6 Edge and the iPhone 6 Plus remained usable event when bent,s so SquareTrade went on to bend both the Galaxy S6 Edge and the iPhone 6 Plus even after they were deformed to see at which point they would meet their catastrophic ends. The Galaxy S6 Edge broke at 149 pounds while the iPhone 6 Plus went on until 179 pounds.

It is important to note that bend tests like this are not exactly reliable replications of what happens in real life. It rarely happens that regular consumers would subject the middle of their phones to a lot of pressure. It should, however, teach Samsung a bit about humility and refraining from rejoicing in the embarrassment of others. Samsung was one of the many companies that tried to cash in on Apple’s Bendgate scandal.

#Bendgate 2? Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Just As Bendable As Apple iPhone 6 Plus [Video]

History repeats itself as Bendgate happens again. This time, however, history serves up a twist as Samsung, Apple’s old rival that shamelessly exploited Bendgate to sell its own wares, is the subject of the next bending smartphone scandal.
(Photo : Square Trade)

The Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge was subjected to a bend test this week, and the results show the Korean smartphone maker could be eating its own pride when it leered and jeered at Apple over Bendgate last year.

Gadget warranty firm SquareTrade put three high-end smartphones to the test, the Galaxy S6 Edge, the HTC One M9, and the iPhone 6 Plus, which became the subject of criticism by disappointed Apple fans complaining that their Apple phablets were bending in their pockets and ridicule by pretty much everyone else, including Samsung.

But a video of SquareTrade’s bend test shows the Galaxy S6 Edge bends just as easily as the iPhone 6 Plus. In fact, the Samsung handset’s screen actually shatters at a point where the iPhone 6 Plus only bent. The One M9, on the other hand, is slightly better at withstanding pressure, but once bent, the handset could no longer be turned on.

Each smartphone is put to the test by placing an increasing weight in the middle of the phone. The SquareTrade test shows both the Galaxy S6 Edge and the iPhone 6 Plus started to bend at 110 pounds, while the One M9 fared slightly better at 120 pounds. However, HTC decided to place the power button of the One M9 in the middle, so when the phone bent, the power button popped out and the phone essentially became a brick, albeit a bent brick.

Both the Galaxy S6 Edge and the iPhone 6 Plus remained usable event when bent,s so SquareTrade went on to bend both the Galaxy S6 Edge and the iPhone 6 Plus even after they were deformed to see at which point they would meet their catastrophic ends. The Galaxy S6 Edge broke at 149 pounds while the iPhone 6 Plus went on until 179 pounds.

It is important to note that bend tests like this are not exactly reliable replications of what happens in real life. It rarely happens that regular consumers would subject the middle of their phones to a lot of pressure. It should, however, teach Samsung a bit about humility and refraining from rejoicing in the embarrassment of others. Samsung was one of the many companies that tried to cash in on Apple’s Bendgate scandal.

 It is possible that the Galaxy S6 could have fared better than the Galaxy S6 Edge, since the latter had more metal taken out to make way for the glass to be used on its curved screen. Glass is brittle and will break faster, while the aluminum used for the Galaxy S6 is more malleable.

However, we have yet to hear reports from users of the Galaxy S6 Edge seeing their premium-priced handsets bending in their pockets. Until then, that old joke about Apple being the original and Samsung the copycat will, in this case, stay true.